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How many chromosomes are there in an unfertilized egg cell?

How many chromosomes are there in an unfertilized egg cell?<br/>

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This question is part of Health and PE Test
Asked by Elma galleros, Last updated: Nov 24, 2020

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4 Answers

Anika Nicole

Anika Nicole

Content Writer, Teacher

Anika Nicole
Anika Nicole, Wordsmith, PG In Journalism, New York

Answered Nov 30, 2018

There are total 23 chromosomes in an unfertilized egg cell.

A human cell consists of total 46 chromosomes,except sex or germ cells. These 23 chromosomes of an unfertilized egg cell are paired with other 23 chromosomes from male sex cell, which in further decide the gender of an unborn child.

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Elma galleros

Elma galleros

Elma galleros
Elma galleros

Answered Jul 29, 2018

C.They had 23 chromosomes

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Sophia Lee Ryan

Sophia Lee Ryan

Sophia Lee Ryan
Sophia Lee Ryan

Answered Aug 18, 2017

23

An unfertilized egg, or ovum, contains 23 chromosomes, which are paired with the 23 chromosomes from a sperm during fertilization. These chromosomes are paired up to determine the unborn child’s physical characteristics, including gender, skin tone, eye color, hair color, and more. The chromosomes contained in an unfertilized egg, as well as in a sperm cell, are completely random. This means that different children from the same mother and father will get different combinations of their parents’ chromosomes.

23

An unfertilized egg, or ovum, contains 23 chromosomes, which are paired with the 23 chromosomes
This is why siblings tend to look similar to one another, as well as similar to their parents, but none of them are identical. An unfertilized egg contains one X chromosome that contributes to determining the baby’s gender; however, because the woman can only contribute X chromosomes, the gender is truly determined by whether the sperm contributes to an "X" or a "Y" chromosome.

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John Smith

John Smith

John Smith
John Smith

Answered Aug 09, 2017

23
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