What is the difference between 'Has' and 'Have'? - ProProfs Discuss
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What is the difference between 'Has' and 'Have'?

Asked by T. Lopez, Last updated: Jan 10, 2021

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7 Answers

youness

youness

Building buildings and building intelligence

youness
Youness , Builder, B. Tech, Bern

Answered Nov 03, 2020

You will use “has” when you are using a third-person singular present tense. When you say “have,” you are going to use this for the first and second person for singular and plural tenses. It may sometimes be confusing to know which one you will use. Definitely, you will use has when you are referring to just one person or one object. For example, you can say, “An apple has a worm inside.” If your noun is going to be plural, you can say, “The apples have a worm inside.” You will notice that worm is not singular but since you are referring to apples, which is the main subject, you will use “have” because this is the plural form.
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Yash Mathers

Yash Mathers

I'm a professional writer. I express through my blog and I keep searching for fresh content over the Internet.

Yash Mathers
Yash Mathers, Content Writer, Diploma in Literature, Austin,Texas

Answered Oct 28, 2020

Different people are going to use has and have depending on what you are going to use. When you use “has,” this means that you are going to refer to just one subject. When you say “have,” this means that you are going to use this for more than one person or object.

For example, you can say, “She has managed to pass her exams.” If you would like to use have, you can say, “They have managed to pass their exams.” Take note that you are going to use these depending on the number of people or objects that you are going to describe.

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C. Lopez

C. Lopez

Driving down to Knowledge town

C. Lopez
C. Lopez, Chauffer, Chauffer, Watertown

Answered Oct 14, 2020

‘Has’ and ‘Have’ are two words that are often used in the English language. They are verbs and precisely referred to as the auxiliary verb. The two actually have relatively the same meaning, such as possess, own, consume, receive, and more. Though they have the same meaning, they can never be used interchangeably.

As earlier stated that they are verbs. Verbs are generally known to be in tenses, i.e., present, past, past participle, and present continuous. Have had all these, but has does not; the major reason is that have the normal verb -a plural verb; while has is a singular verb. Just as other verbs have plural and singular, the same thing is applicable to these two words.

Hence, you can only use have with first and second person singular and plus pronoun or noun, as well as the third person plural noun or pronoun, such as I, we, they, you, etc., while you should use has with third-person singular noun or pronoun, such as he, she, it, etc.

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Samantha Stewart

Samantha Stewart

Love to do some charity work. Have a passion for writing and do it in my spare time

Samantha Stewart
Samantha Stewart, Philanthropist, Post Graduate, Corpus Christi

Answered Oct 14, 2020

You may not see any difference between the words 'Has' and 'Have,' most especially in terms of meaning. In terms of meaning, 'Has' and 'have' can be used in different ways. Some words that can be used to convey their meanings are; receive, experience, own, possess, consume.

What this means is that you can use the two words to mean you possess, consume, experience, own something. Also, the two verbs are called auxiliary verbs, i.e., verbs that accompany the main verb in a clause.

One of the major differences between the two verbs is that they are used differently when forming sentences. The reason is that 'has' is s singular verb while 'have' is a plural verb. However, the major difference between the two is that "has" can only be used together with the singular third person, while "have" can be used for the first, second, and the third person in plural form, as well as for the first, second, and third person in the singular form.

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Anthony Paul Bonadio

Anthony Paul Bonadio

Its kind of my job to give answers

Anthony Paul Bonadio
Anthony Paul Bonadio, Teacher, MCA, PhD, Toledo

Answered Oct 12, 2020

The English language can be complex for someone just learning it. This is because many words have the same meaning, but they differ in which they should be used. An example of this is with the words has and have. Both of these words indicate ownership of something, and they are both verbs.

Has is the singular version. An example of using the word has is with the sentence "He has to go to the store and get eggs because I am unable to make a cake without eggs." Have is the plural tense of the word. An example of having is "We have to go to a concert together since we both love music."

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D. Nichols

D. Nichols

D. Nichols
D. Nichols

Answered Apr 13, 2020

Has and have are considered to be different conjugations of the same verb. They are just used differently depending on the subject that is being used in the sentence. For example, if the noun that is being used is in its singular form, it is already common that the term that will be used to follow the singular noun is "has."

If in case the noun that is being described in the sentence is in plural form, it is the term "have" that will be used. To provide a sample sentence, you can say, “She has purchased ten apples.” You are going to use “has” in order to connect the pronoun with another action verb.

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L. Sevigny

L. Sevigny

L. Sevigny
L. Sevigny, Doctor, Las Vegas

Answered Apr 08, 2020

The word has the third person singular present tense of the verb has. Some examples of sentences include "She can sing," "The cat has the mouse in his mouth.", "She has a pen in her hand," and "He has a big house" These are all examples of sentences with the word," has"The word had, on the other hand, is the past tense of the transitive word, had.

Here are a few examples: "She had dinner at the restaurant," "He had the flu," "They had no option.," and "He had no right to do this.." The one key difference between these two words is tense.

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