What is the suspected diagnosis you can deduce about the patient - ProProfs Discuss
Advertisement

What is the suspected diagnosis you can deduce about the patient below? A 77-year-old woman complains of headache, low-grade fever, malaise, myalgias, intermittent blurred vision, jaw claudication, and other nonspecific symptoms. 
1. The absence of temporal artery tenderness would eliminate the possibility of this condition.
2. Polycythemia is a common finding.
3. Elevated ESR level may be a helpful diagnostic clue.
4. The onset of this disease is typically the age of 40 years or younger.
5. Steroids must be withheld until arterial biopsy can be done.

Asked by Melbourne, Last updated: Oct 17, 2020

+ Answer
Request
Question menu
Vote up Vote down

3 Answers

C.Charlotte

C.Charlotte

C.Charlotte
C.Charlotte

Answered Feb 10, 2020

The erythrocyte sedimentation rate is a common procedure, but it is very non-specific. However, it is a marker for inflammation. ESR is generally accompanied by a fever and headache (specifical pain over the temple). Fatigue is also another symptom and can be associated with high ESR, although that is a very non-specific symptom.

Another culprit of ESR is visual changes in older folks, which is linked with a condition called temporal arteritis. Joint pain may also occur with arthritis and infection. Certain types of arthritis are connected with certain autoimmune diseases. Having a high ESR doesn't necessarily pin down a specific diagnosis right away. It does, however, indicate that something is wrong.

upvote downvote
Reply 

Amla Amelia

Amla Amelia

Amla Amelia
Amla Amelia

Answered Feb 07, 2020

The correct answer to this question is C, Elevated ESR level may be a helpful diagnostic clue. Temporal arteritis, also known as giant cell arteritis, is common branches in carotid arteries. The artery can either be medium or large. This condition is mainly seen in women that are sixty to seventy years old.

There are many common symptoms of temporal arteritis, which include loss of vision in one eye, jaw claudication, and temporal artery tenderness. When one is diagnosed with the condition, they should immediately be treated for the condition. One way to treat it is with steroids, which can help prevent vision loss from progressing.

upvote downvote
Reply 

John Smith

John Smith

John Smith
John Smith

Answered Sep 08, 2016

Elevated esr level may be a helpful diagnostic clue-temporal or giant cell arteritis is most common in branches of the carotid artery but may involve any large or medium artery. the disease is most commonly seen in women in the sixth and seventh decades of life. the classic symptoms of ta are consistent with ischemia to the organs fed by branches of the internal and external carotid artery: visual loss in one eye, temporal artery tenderness, and jaw claudication. patients may complain of nonspecific, vague symptoms such as malaise, weight loss, and fever. headache may be the initial complaint. although the diagnosis is made clinically, helpful laboratory findings include elevated esr (usually > 100 mm/hr on a westergren blot), elevated crp, and anemia. the definitive diagnosis is made by temporal artery biopsy. most patients are extremely sensitive to glucocorticoids, and treatment should be started for any patient with a high clinical suspicion of ta. the steroids do not significantly change the results of the biopsy and may prevent progression to visual loss. (chapter 116)
upvote downvote
Reply 

Advertisement
Advertisement
Search for Google images Google Image Icon
Select a recommended image
Upload from your computer Loader
Image Preview
Search for Google images Google Image Icon
Select a recommended image
Upload from your computer Loader
Image Preview
Search for Google images Google Image Icon
Select a recommended image
Upload from your computer Loader

Email Sent
We have sent an email to your address "" with instructions to reset your password.