What should you do if you're in a meeting and a colleague takes - ProProfs Discuss
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What should you do if you're in a meeting and a colleague takes credit for work that you did?

This question is part of emotional intelligence questionnaire

Asked by Aria, Last updated: Nov 23, 2020

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2 Answers

John Adney

John Adney

John Adney
John Adney

Answered Jun 08, 2017

After the colleague speaks, publicly thank her for referencing your work and give the group more specific detail about what you were trying to accomplish-2. The credit stealing colleaguethe most emotionally intelligent answer is d. By demonstrating an awareness of workplace dynamics, and an ability to control your emotional responses, publicly recognizing your own accomplishments in a non-threatening manner, will disarm your colleague as well as puts you in a better light with your manager and peers. Public confrontations can be ineffective, are likely to cause your colleague to become defensive, and may look like poor sportsmanship on your part. Although less threatening, private confrontations are also less effective in that they will not help your personal reputation.A: 0 points immediately and publicly confront the colleague over the ownership of your work.B: 5 points after the meeting, take the colleague aside and tell her that you would appreciate in the future that she credits you when speaking about your work.C: 0 points nothing, its not a good idea to embarrass colleagues in public.D: 10 points after the colleague speaks, publicly thank her for referencing your work and give the group more specific detail about what you were trying to accomplish.
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John Smith

John Smith

John Smith
John Smith

Answered Sep 08, 2016

After the colleague speaks, publicly thank her for referencing your work and give the group more specific detail about what you were trying to accomplish-2. the credit stealing colleaguethe most emotionally intelligent answer is d. by demonstrating an awareness of workplace dynamics, and an ability to control your emotional responses, publicly recognizing your own accomplishments in a non-threatening manner, will disarm your colleague as well as puts you in a better light with your manager and peers. public confrontations can be ineffective, are likely to cause your colleague to become defensive, and may look like poor sportsmanship on your part. although less threatening, private confrontations are also less effective in that they will not help your personal reputation.a: 0 points immediately and publicly confront the colleague over the ownership of your work.b: 5 points after the meeting, take the colleague aside and tell her that you would appreciate in the future that she credits you when speaking about your work.c: 0 points nothing, its not a good idea to embarrass colleagues in public.d: 10 points after the colleague speaks, publicly thank her for referencing your work and give the group more specific detail about what you were trying to accomplish.
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