What do the Greco Roman "mummy portraits" reflect? - ProProfs Discuss
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What do the Greco-Roman "mummy portraits" reflect?
A. A lack of interest in the afterlife
B. A break from Egyptian burial traditions
C. A blending of Roman and Egyptian burial traditions
D. A rejection of Roman interest in portraiture

What do the Greco-Roman "mummy portraits" reflect?<br/>
A. A lack of interest in the afterlife<br/>
B. A break from Egyptian burial traditions<br/>
C. A blending of Roman and Egyptian burial traditions<br/>
D. A rejection of Roman interest in portraiture

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This question is part of AHI Chapter 3 Quiz
Asked by Catherine halcombe, Last updated: Jan 14, 2021

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2 Answers

Jason B. Elster

Jason B. Elster

Jason B. Elster
Jason B. Elster

Answered Apr 20, 2018

The Persians vanquished Egypt and after Alexander conquered Persia Egypt was a piece of his prize. At the point when Alexander left Egypt in 331 B.C. he exited Cleomenes of Naukratis accountable for the region. At the point when Alexander kicked the bucket, Ptolemy's commanders separated the Domain and Ptolemy took Egypt. Ptolemy was a veteran fighter and trusted leader who had been a beloved companion and served Alexander from that point onward.

The Persians vanquished Egypt and after Alexander conquered Persia Egypt was a piece of his prize.

He began the Ptolemaic Administration, which kept going right around 300 years. In 31 B.C. The Roman Domain took Egypt from the Greeks when Roman Sovereign Octavian vanquished the powers of Check Antony and Cleopatra VII. The Roman time frame finished in 627 A.D, when the Islamic prophet Muhammad, requested that Al-Muqawqis (Cyrus, Patriarch of Alexandria, who directed Egypt for the Byzantine Realm) pull back - which he did.

Egyptians disliked Greek or Roman rulings, therefore there were numerous uprisings. As was befitting the vanquishers and rulers, the Europeans frequently lived separated and kept up their own graveyards/necropolis' - those at the Fayum/Faiyum Desert garden is run of the mill of them. Fayum is 62 miles southwest of Cairo and is the site of numerous necropolis's, Fag el-Gamous is one of them.

It was being used by Europeans from around 300 B.C. to around 400 A.D. what's more, yielded a few Mummy Portraits. Mummy portraits were portraits painted on joined wooden boards, and were set under the wraps covering the mummy's face. In some cases the portrait was painted on mortar veils or painted cloth covers. They were painted in gum based paint or in colors blended with fluid beeswax.
The Mummy portraits was a symbol of blending of Roman and Egyptian burial traditions

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John Smith

John Smith

John Smith
John Smith

Answered Mar 21, 2017

A blending of Roman and Egyptian burial traditions
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