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When do two atoms become isotopes?

When do two atoms become isotopes?

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A. Different atomic numbers
B. The same mass number, but different atomic numbers
C. The same number of protons and neutrons
D. The same number of electrons, but a different number of neutrons
E. The same atomic number, but a different mass number

This question is part of Chemistry Multiple Choice Questions
Asked by Thomasthegreat, Last updated: Sep 18, 2020

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3 Answers

Samantha Stewart

Samantha Stewart

Love to do some charity work. Have a passion for writing and do it in my spare time

Samantha Stewart
Samantha Stewart, Philanthropist, Post Graduate, Corpus Christi

Answered Dec 07, 2018

The correct answer is answering E: the atoms have the same atomic number, but a different number of neutrons. This is key. The atomic number signifies how many protons an atom has. If it has three protons, the atomic number is three. When the electrons are greater or less than the protons, the atom has an electrical charge. If the protons and electrons are equal, then the atom has no charge.

Neutrons are special because they are not electrically charged. The only difference to anything that they can make is a difference in how heavy something is. So, one atom of uranium can have a certain amount of neurons and be radioactive, while another atom may have fewer and be completely stable.

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J.Spencer

J.Spencer

Knowledge Enthusiast, Knows A Lot of Stuff.

J.Spencer
J.Spencer, Knowledge enthusiast, Tokyo

Answered Jul 25, 2018

The answer is E)

Isotopes are two atoms of the same element that have the same atomic number but different mass numbers. The increase in mass number is due to the increase in the number of neutrons. This makes theatom heavier and makes them have different physical properties.

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John Smith

John Smith

John Smith
John Smith

Answered Mar 13, 2017

The same atomic number, but a different mass number

Test 1####
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